Marc Lemire No Longer Works for the City of Hamilton

Marc Lemire No Longer Works for the City of Hamilton

Marc is another victim of Cultural Marxist hit squads & cowardly politicians. CBC reported: “Kojo Damptey, interim executive director for the Hamilton Centre for Civic Inclusion, said Lemire’s departure was ‘a minimal step.'”

“Inclusion” but not for different points of view!

[More details will follow.]

Marc Lemire being presented with Freedom Award by Paul Fromm of the

Canadian Association for Free Expression for his long battle for Internet freedom

imperilled by the thought police at the Canadian Human Rights Commission

“Liberte” — Not Much of That in France: British Satirical Chanteuse Banned for 40 Years From France for Questioning the New Religion of Holocaust

“Liberte” — Not Much of  That in France: British Satirical Chanteuse Banned for 40 Years From France for Questioning the New Religion of Holocaust

Holocaust denier Alison Chabloz barred from entering France for 40 years

The antisemitic performer was stopped at St Pancras station on Monday

Chabloz singing one of her songs
Chabloz singing one of her songs (Photo: YouTube)

A self-described “Holocaust revisionist” has reportedly received a 40-year ban from entering France after attempting to board a Eurostar train to Paris on Monday.

Alison Chabloz, who was convicted last year of two counts of causing obscene material to be sent and one of sending obscene material, used her account on Gab, a social media network popular among the far-right, to say she had been “banned from entering France until 2059”.

Chabloz was given a suspended prison sentence of 20 weeks last June for her “grossly offensive” antisemitic songs, including material mocking Holocaust victims and claims about Jews controlling the world. She was also banned from posting on social media for 12 months.

At an appeal hearing in February at Southwark Crown Court, the convictions were upheld, with the judge describing Chabloz as “a Holocaust denier…manifestly antisemitic and obsessed with what she perceives to be the wrongdoing of Jews”.

In a post to controversial social media network Gab, Chabloz wrote that she had been “questioned first by gendarmes and then Met CTU [Counter Terrorism Unit] under Sec 7 at St Pancras.”

Chabloz's post on Gab
Chabloz’s post on Gab

Chabloz was presumably attempting to refer to Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000, which gives police, immigration and customs officers the right to stop, search and hold individuals at ports, airports and international train stations, if subjects are suspected of involvement in terrorism or any other criminal activity.

Hope Not Hate, the anti-racist advocacy group, tweeted the news to its 89,000 Twitter followers on Monday evening, saying Chabloz “got a surprise trying to get into France this morning.”

Comments from respondents included: “maybe she can write a song about it that nobody wants to hear”, “fantastic news” and “vive la France.”

Holocaust denial is illegal in France. In April, a far-right activist, Alain Soral, was sentenced to a year in prison by a Parisian criminal court for Holocaust denial.

The Ongoing Legal torment of Bill Whatcott: Legal Aid for Illegals but Not Christian Preacher Bill Whatcott?

 

The Ongoing Legal torment of Bill Whatcott: Legal Aid for Illegals but Not Christian Preacher Bill Whatcott?

 

I was in Toronto this morning to attend the continuing saga of the “hate crime” trial of Bill Whatcott.

Bill Whatcott was accused of a “hate crime” and arrested last year under an extraordinary Canada-wide warrant. His “crime” was handing out Christian literature that starkly warned of the physical and spiritual dangers of homosexuality. He had done this peaceably at the 2016 “Gay Pride” parade in Toronto.

For Bill, the process truly is the punishment. Bill has been in the Ontario court system for just over one year now, having made dozens of appearances. Despite this, his case is still at a “pre-trial” stage, with the actual trial date set for January 6th, 2020. Because of all the costs and time involved in travelling to and from court appearances, Bill has had to relocate from his home in Alberta to Ontario, where he is struggling to make ends meet.

To-day’s hearing was called to determine whether or not Bill can receive financial assistance for his legal costs – which are becoming astronomical. Without legal aid, Bill will be forced to represent himself. Considering this is such a pivotal, precedent-setting case for religious freedom in Canada, self-representation is not a very good idea!

The Christian lawyer who has been helping Bill thus far has connected him with one of Ontario’s top criminal lawyers, John Rosen. Mr. Rosen, who is not a Christian, and who has represented some of the most heinous criminals in Canadian history, is willing to take over Bill’s case if legal aid is provided.

I had the opportunity to spend about an hour chatting with Bill and Mr. Rosen this morning, and it is clear that Mr. Rosen is an incredibly intelligent, experienced, and savvy lawyer. He knows Bill’s case, Bill’s history, and has also been tracking other cases involving Christians losing their free speech rights in Canada, like Father Tony Van Hee in Ottawa. He said he found Bill’s case “interesting”.

To-day’s hearing resulted in no actual decision on legal aid for Bill, but another date was set to come back to court and discuss the matter on September 5th. (As I said, the process is the punishment!)

After the hearing, Bill and I spent some time one-on-one talking about his case and the strain it is placing on his finances and family. The prospect of eighteen months in jail is a frightening thought for him, but he is willing to face it for the sake of the Gospel, if it is God’s will. He also told me he feels the Church in Canada is burying its head in the sand when it comes to the increasing threats to her freedom – and to her very existence.

We also discussed the subject of Jonathan “Jessica” Yaniv, a male transsexual who is bullying a number of female aestheticians in BC, using human rights courts to demand that they be forced to provide a Brazilian wax job on “her” male genitals. Mr. Yaniv has also filed a human rights complaint against Bill, seeking $35,000 in damages because Bill called him a man and criticized his bullying of those aestheticians. The BC Human Rights Tribunal has actually decided to take up Mr. Yaniv’s case and pursue his complaint against Bill. As Bill put it so aptly, “He’s the posterchild of all that’s wrong with gender ideology.”

Finally, Bill and I also spent some time in prayer – which was probably the most productive part of Bill’s day! We prayed for God’s help in this country – not only to vindicate Bill, but to wake up the Church! We need to call our nation to repent and turn back to Christ.

You can sign and share our petition in support of Bill here: https://www.citizengo.org/…/163468-christian-charged-hate-c…

Image may contain: one or more people and people standing

Ontario court imposes peace bond against far-right figure over online threats

Ontario court imposes peace bond against far-right figure over online threats

[Richard Warman is the fair-haired boy of the incestuous Ottawa court system. Today it granted him a peace bond against a controversial person, Kevin Goudreau, whom he’d never met and who had never e-mailed or written to him. “I’m so afraid” is a now common posture of anti-racists who devote themselves to ruining the lives of people whose politics are contrary to theirs. — Paul Fromm]

 

Ottawa lawyer Richard Warman said he applied to the Ontario Court of Justice for a peace bond on June 3 after police repeatedly declined to lay charges against Kevin Goudreau. Today, the decision whether or not to grant the peace bond will be made.

A A

An Ontario court has imposed a peace bond against a far-right figure, in what is believed to be the first instance in which activists have sought such a peace bond in response to right-wing extremism in Canada.

Justice of the Peace Stephanie Goffin-Boyd on Monday ordered Kevin Goudreau, head of the Canadian National Front, to enter into the peace bond and abide by four conditions for 12 months, including not making violent threats online or otherwise towards Ottawa lawyer Richard Warman, and other board members with the Canadian Anti-Hate Network.

Goudreau is also prohibited from possessing any weapons.


In June, Warman asked the court to issue a peace bond that would order Goudreau, who resides in Peterborough, Ont., to cease making threats online against him. Warman, who a board member with the Canadian Anti-Hate Network, said police had repeatedly declined to lay charges against Goudreau, and so he pursued a peace bond, which is like a restraining order.

The Crown took over the matter for Warman, who served as the only witness at the hearing on Monday.

“I had no expectations, but I am absolutely relieved,” Warman told Global News after the decision was rendered. He said he wished that police had pursued criminal charges, but that the peace bond sets a positive precedent for human rights activists who are targeted online and looking for possible remedies.

After the Christchurch, New Zealand attacks in March, a post was shared on a Facebook page belonging to Goudreau. The post encouraged violence against “priority targets” including the Canadian Anti Hate Network, other anti-racist groups and government agencies.

It also mentioned media outlets including VICE, the National Post and CBC.


Goudreau, who represented himself at court, said at the hearing that the social media posts aren’t his. Goudreau previously told Global News that his website states his group does not “promote, advocate or incite hatred or violence by our members or anyone else.”

The court said there was no evidence to suggest that the social media posts were not Goudreau’s.

Warman, who has monitored far-right and neo-Nazi movements in Canada for decades, told the court that Goudreau’s posts made him fear for his safety.

“It’s not just the potential for Mr. Goudreau … it’s for the fellow neo-Nazis who are actually reading the post. Because we know that there is a long history of violence involved in the neo-Nazi movement in Canada,” Warman told the court. He added that the posts disputed by Goudreau are consistent with other written and video content posted by him over the years.

Goudreau, chairman of the Canadian Nationalist Front (formerly the White Nationalist Front) who has a large swastika tattooed on his chest, was banned from Facebook and Twitter in April as part of a crackdown on extremist content and “organized hate” that followed the New Zealand mosque attack that left 51 people dead. The blog for Goudreau’s group, however, is still online and active.

READ MORE: Facebook bans half-dozen Canadian pages under extremism, hate policy

In a brief cross-examination of Warman, Goudreau asked whether they had ever communicated directly or indirectly. Warman responded that they had not spoken directly or met in person, but that he felt the posts were an indirect form of communication between them — and that the posts were threatening.

“What makes you think that I am any particular danger besides these supposed internet postings?” Goudreau asked Warman.

“Because you’ve engaged in threats of violence, and counselling violence, over the past at least eight years that I’ve seen communications by you posted online, whether in person, through Youtube videos, or through social media postings,” Warman replied.

“If I go to the posting itself, you openly advocate shooting high-value targets, as you describe them, in the wake of a terrorist attack that left 51 people dead. So, if I think that there is the likelihood of copycat violence taking place in the wake of those kinds of attacks and then you go and advocate that specific thing, including shooting me and my colleagues twice in the head to ensure that we’re dead, that makes me reasonably fearful for my safety.”

 

Addresses for German Political Prisoners

 

Addresses for German Political Prisoners

 

 

GERMAN POLITICAL PRISONERS

WRITE TO SYLVIA STOLZ at the following address:

Sylvia Stolz
Münchener Str. 33
86551 Aichach

Germany

Write to Ursula Haverbeck at the following address:

JVA Bielefeld-Brackwede
z. Hd. Ursula Haverbeck
Umlostraße 100
33649 Bielefeld
Germany

Write to Alfred Schaefer:

Alfred Erhard Schaefer
Stadelheimer Str. 12
81549 Munich
Germany

WRITE TO HORST MAHLER

Justivollzugsanstalt Brandenburg A.D. Havel,
Inhaftierter: Horst Mahler,
Anton-Saefkow-Allee 22,
14772 Brandenburg,
Germany

Monika Schaefer on the Brian Ruhe Show: 18 Months More in Prisoner for Dissident Alfred Schaefer for Defending Himself in Court
 
Just received this bad news tonight from Alfred’s sister Monika. This is the brief video we just released:

Alfred Schaefer Receives 18 Months Additional Prison Time for Defending Himself!

https://www.bitchute.com/video/2mqWlxOFiMA1/

Please write to Alfred, a Canadian in prison in Germany.

 
SEND A CARD OR SHORT LETTER TO THIS “MAN BEHIND THE WIRE”:

Alfred Schaefer
JVA Stadelheim
Stadelheimer Str 12
81549, Munich (München)
GERMANY

Political Prisoner Alfred Schaefer Gets 18-More Months in a German Jail for Defending Himself in Court

Political Prisoner Alfred Schaefer Gets 18-More Months in a German Jail for Defending Himself in Court

On Thursday Alfred was in court to face new charges for the crime of speaking in his defense during our trial last year. The prosecutor wanted 24 months, he received 18 months. The prosecutor says that is too light and is appealing. To be clear, these 18 months are in addition to the 38 months that he is already sentenced with.

The law says you cannot say XYZ, then in court you cannot explain how you reached your conclusions of XYZ, nor are you allowed to bring forth evidence to support your conclusions, because when you do, you do new crime because your words can be heard by the public in the gallery. That is what Alfred did. New crime committed in the public courtroom, while defending himself.

When history comes to you enforced by law, only one thing is for certain: it is a lie. Or perhaps you can explain things differently to me.

Love,
Monika

The case of Rhino Albino and other B.C. human rights complaints Earl’s Albino Rhino beer had been on offer for 25 years when the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal agreed to hear a complaint by a woman with albinism The label for Albino Rhino Ale made in 2012 for Earl’s Restaurant in Western Canada. Genna Buck Genna Buck August 8, 2019 5:17 PM EDT Filed under News Canada Comment Facebook Twitter Reddit Email More The B.C. Human Rights Tribunal has heard some offbeat complaints in its recent history, including a complaint about Albino Rhino beer and a waiter who said he was fired for being too French. Complaints have to be made within six months and many are resolved with mediation. They only proceed to a hearing if the tribunal rules that the complainant has a reasonable chance of succeeding. Here are some greatest hits: The Albino Rhino beer summit Ikponwosa Ero, the United Nations’ independent expert on the enjoyment of human rights by persons with albinism, addresses a press conference at the end of her official visit to Malawi on April 29, 2016. AMOS GUMULIRA/AFP/Getty Images In 2012, Ikponwosa Ero, a woman with albinism, launched a human rights complaint against Earl’s Restaurants in Vancouver because it had a beer called Albino Rhino on tap. The product had been on offer for 25 years at that point. The company claimed the rhyming name was intended to be “whimsical and fun” and denote that the beer was “rare and special,” like a white rhino, and was not intended to be discriminatory. People with albinism, which is genetic, are completely or partially missing the natural pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. They’re susceptible to vision problems and skin cancer. In some cultures around the world, they face threats of violence, discrimination and even murder. Ero originally went through the advocacy organization where she worked to try to get Earl’s to drop the name, but was unsuccessful. The B.C. Human Rights Tribunal agreed to hold a hearing, but instead the two parties managed to talk things out among themselves and Earl’s voluntarily agreed to phase out the branding. The restaurant put out a statement in early 2013 stating, “Like many Canadians we knew very little about the condition or the very real discrimination persons with albinism experience, both in Canada and around the world,” and agreed, “Persons with albinism are a stigmatized group that face prejudice and exclusion in many areas of Canadian society.” Not rude, just French When Guillame Rey, a server at a Vancouver Milestones restaurant, was fired from his job for rudeness in August 2017, he claimed it wasn’t his fault — he’s French. The professional manner Rey’s co-workers called “combative” and his employer described as “rude and disrespectful” was simply “direct and expressive” and totally within the norms in his home country of France, Rey claimed. He said firing him amounted to discrimination on the basis of place of origin — a creative interpretation of section 13 of the province’s Human Rights Code. Last year, the tribunal denied the restaurant’s application to have the case dismissed. It’s expected to proceed to a hearing. Is being called ‘creepy’ sexist and racist? Mokua Gichuru, a man whose use of the B.C. court system has been legally limited because of his long-established habit to sue over anything and everything, complained to the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal in 2016 because a Vancouver swing dancing club banned him for being “creepy.” This amounts to “blatant stereotyping” of older, black men interacting with younger women, and is discrimination on the basis of age, sex and race, Gichuru claimed. Though the tribunal has declined to hear the case twice, it may yet proceed to a hearing, as Gichuru said that directors of the club banned him from events in retaliation for his threat to make a human rights complaint. ‘Reorganizing her out of the workplace’ Many recent cases have pertained to issues of disability accommodation in the workplace. For example, in July the tribunal heard the case of Norma Graham, a woman with a mental disability who had worked for the payroll department at B.C. Transit since 1991. In 2014, the organization made the switch to an open-concept office, and Graham complained that she was no longer able to concentrate on her work because of noisy conversations taking place near her desk. She asked to have her workstation moved and was denied. She also provided a medical note, but ended up taking a two-year medical leave soon after. When she returned to work, she was shuffled between various positions. Graham alleged that she no longer received the benefits she had at her old job. BC Transit eventually decided she would not be able to return to the payroll department. Graham ended up taking medical leave again. The tribunal ruled that B.C. Transit had done enough to accommodate Graham. Though the decision states that it was “unfortunate” that Graham felt her employer was not acting in good faith, and instead “reorganizing her out of the workplace,” the complaint was dismissed.

The case of Rhino Albino and other B.C. human rights complaints

[The tyranny of human rights commissions. Enabled minorities oppress Canada’s dispossessed Majority.   Paul Fromm]

Earl’s Albino Rhino beer had been on offer for 25 years when the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal agreed to hear a complaint by a woman with albinism

The label for Albino Rhino Ale made in 2012 for Earl’s Restaurant in Western Canada.

The B.C. Human Rights Tribunal has heard some offbeat complaints in its recent history, including a complaint about Albino Rhino beer and a waiter who said he was fired for being too French.

Complaints have to be made within six months and many are resolved with mediation. They only proceed to a hearing if the tribunal rules that the complainant has a reasonable chance of succeeding.

Here are some greatest hits:

The Albino Rhino beer summit

Ikponwosa Ero, the United Nations’ independent expert on the enjoyment of human rights by persons with albinism, addresses a press conference at the end of her official visit to Malawi on April 29, 2016. AMOS GUMULIRA/AFP/Getty Images

In 2012, Ikponwosa Ero, a woman with albinism, launched a human rights complaint against Earl’s Restaurants in Vancouver because it had a beer called Albino Rhino on tap. The product had been on offer for 25 years at that point.

The company claimed the rhyming name was intended to be “whimsical and fun” and denote that the beer was “rare and special,” like a white rhino, and was not intended to be discriminatory. People with albinism, which is genetic, are completely or partially missing the natural pigment in their skin, hair and eyes. They’re susceptible to vision problems and skin cancer. In some cultures around the world, they face threats of violence, discrimination and even murder. Ero originally went through the advocacy organization where she worked to try to get Earl’s to drop the name, but was unsuccessful.

The B.C. Human Rights Tribunal agreed to hold a hearing, but instead the two parties managed to talk things out among themselves and Earl’s voluntarily agreed to phase out the branding. The restaurant put out a statement in early 2013 stating, “Like many Canadians we knew very little about the condition or the very real discrimination persons with albinism experience, both in Canada and around the world,” and agreed, “Persons with albinism are a stigmatized group that face prejudice and exclusion in many areas of Canadian society.”

Not rude, just French

When Guillame Rey, a server at a Vancouver Milestones restaurant, was fired from his job for rudeness in August 2017, he claimed it wasn’t his fault — he’s French.

The professional manner Rey’s co-workers called “combative” and his employer described as “rude and disrespectful” was simply “direct and expressive” and totally within the norms in his home country of France, Rey claimed. He said firing him amounted to discrimination on the basis of place of origin — a creative interpretation of section 13 of the province’s Human Rights Code.

Last year, the tribunal denied the restaurant’s application to have the case dismissed. It’s expected to proceed to a hearing.

Is being called ‘creepy’ sexist and racist?

Mokua Gichuru, a man whose use of the B.C. court system has been legally limited because of his long-established habit to sue over anything and everything, complained to the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal in 2016 because a Vancouver swing dancing club banned him for being “creepy.” This amounts to “blatant stereotyping” of older, black men interacting with younger women, and is discrimination on the basis of age, sex and race, Gichuru claimed.

Though the tribunal has declined to hear the case twice, it may yet proceed to a hearing, as Gichuru said that directors of the club banned him from events in retaliation for his threat to make a human rights complaint.

‘Reorganizing her out of the workplace’

Many recent cases have pertained to issues of disability accommodation in the workplace. For example, in July the tribunal heard the case of Norma Graham, a woman with a mental disability who had worked for the payroll department at B.C. Transit since 1991. In 2014, the organization made the switch to an open-concept office, and Graham complained that she was no longer able to concentrate on her work because of noisy conversations taking place near her desk. She asked to have her workstation moved and was denied. She also provided a medical note, but ended up taking a two-year medical leave soon after. When she returned to work, she was shuffled between various positions. Graham alleged that she no longer received the benefits she had at her old job. BC Transit eventually decided she would not be able to return to the payroll department. Graham ended up taking medical leave again. The tribunal ruled that B.C. Transit had done enough to accommodate Graham. Though the decision states that it was “unfortunate” that Graham felt her employer was not acting in good faith, and instead “reorganizing her out of the workplace,” the complaint was dismissed.