“I’m trapped in my own police state,” say ex-political prisoner & dissident Brad Love, raided by cops with blank search warrant

“I’m trapped in my own police state,” say ex-political prisoner  & dissident Brad Love, raided by cops with blank search warrant
“I am trapped in my own police state and it’s called Fort McMurray, Alberta,” exclaims Brad Love, an outspoken dissident and former political prisoner, after a police raid on his Fort Mac residence on March 23
 
The police came with a blank warrant — no mention of what they were looking for. They left with three bags of property but left Mr. Love with no receipt for the goods stolen.
 
Mr. Love lives with three other room mates. He was in the shower when seven burly cops used a ram to hammer open an unlocked door and storm in with rifles and guns drawn.  “They’ve been watching too much television,” says the unarmed writer and dissident.
 
The next day in traffic court, Mr. Love spoke to a legal aid lawyer in another matter. The lawyer said: “The police can pretty much do what they want. You could hire a lawyer and apply to the court for reasons for the warrant and a list of what was taken.”
 
Mr. Love has searing contempt for lawyers in Fort Mac. “Half the lawyers in town are afraid of me and won’t talk to me. They are afraid of the police. I need a headhunter lawyer. This is a small town and the cops, the courts and the lawyers are in a comfy, cozy relationship,” he adds.
 
Anyone else would be able to march down to the police station and inquire about the blank warrant and ask for a list of the goods stolen However, Mr. Love is in the final year of a three-year probation order, imposed on him, not in North Korea but in Ontario. He is forbidden to communicate his views to any political, press, police or religious organization.. Thus, strictly speaking, he is not allowed to even speak to the police. And justice is not just blind, it is brainless and literal as well, in Mr. Love’s case.
 

Political Prisoner Brad Love at work in the oilpatch

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He wonders whether the incident was cop payback for a confrontation the day before. He and a friend were driving in town. They noticed a car pulled over and being ticketed by the RCMP. Mr. Love who was in the passenger seat called out, “Go get him, di Pasquale.” Moments later two RCMP cruisers chased after Mr. Love’s vehicle. He was ordered out of the car, but said: “I am not the driver. I don’t have to get out.” The police searched the car, without a warrant and then issued Mr. Love, who was not the driver, a $600 ticket for “stunting”.
 
“Stunting”, in Alberta, is defined as:
 “115 (2) A person shall not do any of the following:

(e) perform or engage in any stunt or other activity that is likely to distract, startle or interfere with users of the highway;
(f) drive a vehicle so as to perform or engage in any stunt or other activity on a highway that is likely to distract, startle or interfere with other users of the highway;

 
The policeman in question wasn’t even driving or using the road at the time of the incident. Mr. Love described officer  di Pasquale as “a head hunter. There is bad blood between us.”

Can a song be a Crime?

Can a song be a Crime?
The persecution of British singer and satirist Alison Chabloz for some of her holocaust-skeptical songs  makes a mockery of British free speech rights. The private prosecution, launched by Gideon Falter of the well-heeled anti-free speech group, the Campaign Against Anti-Semitism, took an alarming turn on Friday. On one day’s notice, Alison was summoned for a hearing to restrict her activities whilst on bail. “

” The judge told her she is not allowed to tweet or blog about her prosecutor Gideon Falter. That was unfair, her lawyer objected, because he had been tweeting about her – overruled. Nor – here was the punch line – was she allowed to do anything ‘racist’ or ‘anti-semitic’ or ‘grossly offensive:’ if she does she will be locked up until her trial, next March. These are incredibly vague and undefined terms. But, I suspect Mr Falter is not going to find this trial the pushover which he has expected.”


It is appalling that merely offending privileged group’s feelings can land a singer in court. As in Canada, with victims like Brad Love and Terry Tremaine, the vile system uses bail or parole conditions to gag a dissident even BEFORE a trial. Here the talented Miss Chabloz faces months in jail is she does anything “racist” or “anti-semitic” or “grossly offensive.” The message is clear: Shut up! What is “racist”? If you express pride in being a homosexual or being a Negro, that’s fine; if you are proud of your European heritage, you’re a “racist” And what is “grossly offensive”? It’s all in the yes of the beholder and minorities, especially Jews, have become adept at being easily offended.
Another similarity with Canada is that Miss Chabloz is not permitted to tweet or blog about her tormenter Gideon Falter. Apparently, he can agress against people but the victims cannot comment or mention him. Exactly, the same thing happened to Canadian free speech victim Arthur Topham who is not allowed to mention Richard Warman or Harry Abrams who sought to shut him down and filed complaints which led to the Sec. 319 (“hate law” charges) against him. Oh, yes, neither bothered to show up at Mr. Topham’s trial to see the mischief they had caused.
Paul FrommDirectorCANADIAN ASSOCIATION FOR FREE EXPRESSION

Can a song be a Crime?

2 comments

Friday, 23rd December: Marylebone Magistrate’s Court.

Alison Chablez has been suddenly called back from Manchester with only one days notice, because the Prosecution wishes to redefine the terms of her bail. A week earlier, she had turned up, for a rather strange indeed unheard-of type of prosecution. A Campaign Against Anti-Semitism had decided a song of hers violated Section 127 of the 2003 Communications Act, and was ‘grossly offensive.’

In Britain today, can you be prosecuted because someone reckons your behavior is offensive?* No-one seemed to be providing evidence of anyone having been offended – we merely had the word of  Jonathan Goldberg QC, prosecution barrister (who had three attorneys sitting behind him for some sort of moral backup). Mr Gideon Falter, chair of CAAS evidently reckons so. Normally it is the business of the CPS the Crown Prosecution Service to bring such charges, but Mr Falter reckoned they were being rather dilatory in prosecuting anti-semitism and he is speeding up the process by taking out this private prosecution.

The distinguished British philosopher and tenor sax player Gilad Atzman turned up to give Ms Chablez some moral support, and I felt his presence was quite significant. Let’s hope he blogs about it. The best feature of this hearing was Ms Chablez’ marvellous lawyer Adrian Davies, let’s hope he is still defending her in March. Chablez

Can a song be a crime?  The dire charges – anti-semitism, racism Holo-denial – have effectively ended her career as a folk musician. Tell me about it. The doors do clang shut once Gods’s Chosen People reckon you don’t believe in their Holo-narrative. You thereby come to understand, like never before, who controls our world.

Let’s have a quote from her about her prosecution:

Thursday December 15, I shall be appearing in court for the first time in my life charged with causing gross offence after posting my song (((Survivors))) on YouTube. What makes this case special is the fact that I am not being prosecuted by the Crown; it is a private prosecution taken on by chairman of the wealthy Zionist ‘charity’, Campaign Against Antisemitism (CAA), Gideon Falter, who – in order to persuade the judge that publishing my song merits a heavy fine – will have to prove that my song is grossly offensive.

I should here confess: after her inspiring performance at a packed London Forum, ’Songs of the Shoah’ she did allude to my book.  She has been described as ‘the pin-up girl of Stormfront.’

You might want to check out here Alison’s rather sensible views on the obscure Havaara agreement, and how Red Ken’s politicial career was suddenly over because of his comments upon the matter.

Coming back to the bail trial, the judge told her she is not allowed to tweet or blog about her prosecutor Gideon Falter. That was unfair, her lawyer objected, because he had been tweeting about her – overruled. Nor – here was the punch line – was she allowed to do anything ‘racist’ or ‘anti-semitic’ or ‘grossly offensive:’ if she does she will be locked up until her trial, next March. These are incredibly vague and undefined terms. But, I suspect Mr Falter is not going to find this trial the pushover which he has expected.

I had been hoping to sell my book together with her new CD. My publisher had agreed, but now she reckons she might just be locked up if she did anything like that.

It is clear that the Communications Act of 2003 was designed to regulate commercial broadcasting, in relation to the OFCOM inspectorate – not for private individuals.Chabloz2

It is vital that the great British tradition of satire – from Hogarth to Private Eye – is defended. One is permitted to scoff at people, especially rich, influential people – it is not a crime.

There is a lot at stake here. While talking to a former member of the British punk-rock band ‘Crass,’ he played me a bit of the ghastly racket they used to make, and I heard the dire lyrics. The Crown tried to prosecute them under the Blasphemy Act – but gave up. That is an important precedent. It’s called freedom of expression. I personally object to Jews insisting that everyone else has to believe their fictional, fabricated, fake narrative about what did not happen in the German labor camps of WW2; and salute Alison Chabloz for pointing out, in humorous songs – that IT DIDN’T HAPPEN.

NO Mr Falter, it’s a fictional story. And, by the way Mr Falter, you have no drop of semitic blood in you. But, your country is exterminating the semites, and stealing their land. It’s called genocide.

Muad-Dib

 

* “ This is what happens, when this group are upset by something. They assume they have the right not to be offended, as they obviously so easily are. It’s almost impossible to be part of their mind-virus unless you have been programmed into it…” Mark windows.

 

Hear Paul Fromm & Brad Love on Patricia Aitken’s Sacred Cows’ Barbecue

Hear Paul Fromm & Brad Love on Patricia Aitken’s Sacred Cows’ Barbecue

 

Paul Fromm, Director of the Canadian Association for Free Expression & Brad Love, Canadian political prisoner and citizen journalist interviewed on Patrica Aitken’s Sacred Cows BBQ!

https://youtu.be/9owFhBoCc_Y

Paul Fromm, Director of CAFE- Canadian Association for Free Expression has fought for victims of Canada’s thought police such as Ernst Zundel, David Irving, Arthur Topham and special guest Brad Love. Brad shares how writing non-threatening letters to government idiots landed him in prison. He also shares about life in post-fire Fort McMurray.

Frederick Fromm's photo.

Welcome Back to Fort Mac — You’re Under Arrest

Political Prisoner Brad Love at work in the oilpatch

Political Prisoner Brad Love at work in the oilpatch

 
           Former political prisoner and citizen journalist Brad Love had only been back in Fort McMurray for four days and five (yes 5!) police squad cars pulled up to his apartment and burly RCMP officers put this dangerous letter writing under arrest for “harassment”. This part of years of real harassment perpetrated by the local Mounties on the outspoken Mr. Love.
 
           His latest crime? Heckling and getting into a verbal argument with a gang of cleanup workers, some Third Worlders, some students brought up from Edmonton and housed in a camp. “You guys are ruining the jobs market here. You are working for slave wages at $16 an hour, There are no jobs here for us,” he added. The workers surrounded his car.
 
 
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            Brad points out that, with the extremely high cost of living in Fort Mac, $16 an hour may seem like a good wage, “but you can’t pay rent or run a car on that.” The only way these temps can do it, it they are fed and housed in a camp and driven to the work projects.
 
            One of the people he shouted at snapped a picture of Brad and his car.
 
            In politically correct Canada, even many seemingly manly outdoor workers are feminized, pussyfied babies. A generation ago, a dispute like this might have been  settled with one side or the other throwing the finger and both parties walking away. Not today! Someone scuttled off to phone the Mounties about “inappropriate” comments — no threats of violence, mind you — by the voluble Mr. Love.
 
            Later that evening, five police cars pulled up to arrest and cuff the unarmed man with an opinion.
 
            Mr. Love was held for 21 hours. One might have expected “released on one’s own recognisance” for this non-violent charge. Mr. Love has been scrupulous in attending previous court hearings. Instead, a Justice of the Peace extorted $1,000 cash bail. “Outrageous,” spits Mr. Love in recounting the incident.
 
             On returning to his apartment, worried neighbours whispered to Mr. Love that his neighbourhood “had been crawling with cops” the previous evening and that the “RCMP had cordoned off neighbourhood streets and part of a highway” looking for the outspoken man.
 
              Mr. Love contrasts this fanatical diligence for going after a soft target — a man who writes and voices his views — with the RCMP’s spectacular failure to solve more than a dozen recent murders, mostly of Somalis, suspected on being in the drug trade.
             Politicians and news media  in Fort McMurray who don’t like being challenged have conspired to box Mr. Love in. When he has called to voice his views, they call the police. A parole condition is that he not contact any media or police to express his views. [This conditions was, incidentally, imposed in Canada, not North Korea!]
             What the police now seem to do is charge Mr. Love after any complaint. He’s out bail money and under the shadow of a charge for months. Then, frequently just before a trial where the ridiculous nature of the charge and the pattern of police harassment could be exposed, the charges are quietly withdrawn.
             As Mr. Love was sticking up for Fort McMurray’s many unemployed, he was advised by CAFE to approach the Alberta Federation of Labour for support and perhaps, legal assistance.
            Mr. Love was one of 80,000 Fort McMurray residents forced to evacuate the city after out-of-control forest fires menaced the entire cities and destroyed 2,400 homes, including the one Mr. Love lived in. “I got out with one suitcase and my car. I lost almost all my work clothes and tools and 10 years of memorabilia since I moved to Fort Mac,” he explains. He went first to Edmonton and then Lac Lebiche, all the while keeping in touch with old bosses in the  hopes of a job as the town rebuilds.
           Brad Love has the Protestant  work ethic on steroids. he is known as an indefatigable and hard weorker. As soon as he got the all clear, he lined up an apartment and returned Tuesday, June 7 to Fort Mac.
             Welcome home! You know you’re in Canada. You’er told to do your job (if you have one), pay your taxes, shut your mouth and not offer an opinion if it’s not politically correct.

 

Former Political Prisoner Brad Love Denounces Anti-White Discrimination & Is Arrested Again

Former Political Prisoner Brad Love Denounces Anti-White Discrimination & Is Arrested Again

Imagine a radio advertisement repeatedly advising that a company was providing training – let’s say in operating a forklift – but to Whites only. The howls of protest would be immediate. The anti-racist and White-hating groups would fly into a frenzy. The human rights lobby would roar. There’d be a protest to the CRTC. There would be fiery editorials denouncing the company and the radio station. There would be questions in Parliament. Everyone from Ontario’s lesbian premier to the town drunk would denounce the station and the company. Almost immediately the advertising manager would be fired, perhaps even the station manager. All employees would be enrolled in mandatory brainwashing “diversity” courses. Meanwhile, the offending company would fire its president, publicly and abjectly apologize and then hand out fists-full of cash to various ethnic groups. You know it’s true.
 
 
Frederick Fromm's photo.

 

Well, now another reality. On January 18, former political prisoner Brad Love heard repeated ads on the town’s rock ‘n roll radio station Rock 97.9. The ads by security giant Garda offered 40 hours of training for security guards. The one catch is that this offer was for “natives” – that is, Indians – only. Totally racist and discriminatory! Fort McMurray resident Brad Love, despite the Stalinist probation conditions imposed on him, was determined to act. Fort McMurray is suffering severe unemployment. [Statistics Canada reports a 7.4 per unemployment rate in Alberta for January, 2016.] Due to the low price of oil, many oil patch companies are laying off workers. Brad first approached Garda. He asked for an application. “You’re not a status Indian or a Metis,” he was told. “You don’t look Indian.” In the end, he left with an application form.

 

His next stop was Rock 97.9 He approached the radio station to obtain a business card or letter head so that he would have precise information for his human rights complaint. Now, he couldn’t directly protest or express his political views.  He would have to be careful. In July 2012, having slapped him with an 18-month sentence for having sent non-violent information packages to Toronto Jewish groups  in supposed violation of his probation order,  Ontario Judge Kelly Wright imposed a three year gag order on Mr. Love,  rendering him a virtual non-citizen: “Mr.  Love is to refrain from any political speech or commentary to any media  outlet, political, cultural or religious group or organization, or  police organization.” Yes, that`s an Ontario judge, not one of Kim Jong-un’s judges in North Korea. His visit to the radio station was Kafkaesque. The receptionist wouldn’t look him in the eye. She acted strangely and refused to provide a business card.

 

Brad proceeded to file complaints against both Garda and Rock 97.9 with the Alberta Human Rights Commission on the grounds of racial discrimination. Mr. Love filed his complaint. On February 3, the Alberta Human Rights Commission contacted him. They were acknowledging and accepting his complaint against Garda. However, they advised, as telecommunications was a federal; matter, he would have to complain to the Canadian Human Rights Commission.

 

On Wednesday, February 3,  he was informed by his room mates that two police cruisers had come looking for him and had asked him to contact that RCMP detachment. Brad did nothing. Friday evening, February 5, CAFÉ received a call today from former political prisoner Brad Love. He was in custody at the RCMP station in Fort McMurray, Alberta, charged with “breach of probation,” for having visited the radio station. Note, he’d offered no statements or political opinions.  “The station puts forth an image of ‘rock ‘roll rebels,” Mr. Love says, “but when Brad Love shows up in the lobby asking for a business card, they call the RCMP.”

Mr. Love was arrested at 9:30 on Febuary 5 but not released until 4:30 the next day — an unusually long detention for an alleged non-violent offence. He did not get to speak top a Justice of the Peace until 6:30 a.m. The police wanted $1,000 bail. Mr., Love told the JP: “I’ve been in this town for nine years and have never spent a night in jail.”

“Maybe you should have,” snapped the JP.

“He’s a prejudiced …” said Mr. Love who had appeared before this man on previous occasions. Mr. Love had to post $250 in bail.

His paperwork charges him with attended the offices of KICS 98 Radio in violation of his probation order. KICS 98 closed its offices more than two years ago!

Mr. Love noted the deliberate delay in releasing him into a winter blizzard. “All the hobos and bums got out before me. I’m the only guy in here who regularly has a job.”

“Well, if you’re going to be like that,” his RCMP tormenters said to him and delayed him a bit longer.

CATCH 22: RCMP VISIT BRAD LOVE THREE TIMES IN ONE WEEK, BUT COURT SAYS HE CAN’T TALK TO THEM

CATCH 22: RCMP VISIT BRAD LOVE THREE TIMES IN ONE WEEK, BUT COURT SAYS HE CAN’T TALK TO THEM

On Monday, August 24, I received an urgent call from former political prisoner Brad Love (under Canada’s “hate law” he’d received 18 months in prison for writing non-violent letters to politicians)
 
Brad was in a Catch 22 situation: damned if you do, damned if you don’t.
 
 
 
 
Frederick Fromm's photo.Brad Love in Fort McMurray
 
He’d arrived home from work in Fort McMurray that afternoon and found a business card from the RCMP. He informed his advisors at CAFE, lest he be arrested, passed the word to several others and went out to dinner with a friend.
 
Why, you might ask, did he not take the card and call the cop back? Well, he’s under a probation order from Ontario Judge Kelly Wright forbidding him from contacting or expressing his views to police, media or political groups. [Yes, that Orwellian order was imposed, not in communist North Korea or in some African despotism, but in an Ontario court that gurgles on about Trudeau’s Charter of [very limited] Rights and Freedoms.
 
Specifically, Judge Wright’s July, 2012 order insisted: “Mr.  Love is to refrain from any political speech or commentary to any media  outlet, political, cultural or religious group or organization, or  police organization.
 
So, strictly speaking, Brad was not supposed to talk to the police. Were they trying to entrap him and send him back to jail. Fort McMurray sees regular killings among its newly acquired Somali community but the RCMP seem to spend an inordinate amount of time and manpower trailing, visiting and harassing the town’s most prominent dissident.
 
Brad continues the account. “On August 26 the RCMP attended my house for the third day in a row to finally toldl me that I’m being investigated for ‘writing to Ottawa officials.’
 
It takes two cops in two cars to do all this? And am I actually being ‘investigated’ or intimidated?
 
I asked them this. I also told them that I am under  their own order as well as a Court order not to communicate with them and, as they had visited me three times to communicate with me, this constitutes a ‘conspiracy to impel an offender to breach  bail/court orders’ and I would be subpoenaing them to my October 26 trial to let a judge hear of this.
 
They were not happy campers upon hearing this.
 
And the beat goes on.
 
Locally, I am dying to have answers to the following questions, yet dare not ask a single yellow-bellied politico or media sap any of them,
 
They are:
 
1. Besides Kuwaiti money being poured into it, is any public money being thrown at the local super mosque that’s being built?
 
2. How much did our Western Summer Games cost/lose?
 
3. What is the true price of our real estate collapse in Alberta?
 
4. Who dares to take on or even discuss all of those ‘Natives only’ hiring practices?
 
5. There are so many Somali shootings here, yet no media attention. Why?
 
6. Who calls for the media’s constant stream of multicult promotion or do they make it all up themselves?
 
7. How many millions of dollars are sucked out of my country by Temporary Foreign Workers sending money home to the Philippines, Jamaica, Africa, etc.?
 
8. And what do banks like the TD, RBC or Western Union make by facilitating such a drain?
 
9. What does our over-staffed $1.25 a ride whoosh transit company lose yearly?
 
10. How many local jobs have been lost due to the $43-a-barrel oil?
 
11. What do so many sickly recent immigrants and their  large broods, whom I never see working, cost my local hospital, schools and welfare system?
 
12. There are many sports and entertainment facilities being built here that no one asked for. What are their final costs to the taxpayers? And how many people will actually use them? Beware of your government using your money to amuse you.
 
13. Why is the Food Bank here always empty?
 
14. Why does China or Chinese interests won 20% of Syncrude and all of Nexen, Husky Energy and Synopec? — Paul Fromm

 

The Legal Grinding of Brad Love

The Legal Grinding of Brad Love
Free speech victims are slowly ground down by the judicial system. It is not just an abuse of process it is an abuse BY process.
 
In 2003, inveterate letter-writing Brad Love was sent to jail for 18 months for sending letters critical of immigration to 20 MPs and other public officials. He was saddled with increasingly onerous parole conditions, at one point, being forbidden to write to “any person” without their consent.
 
On January 19, having disposed to a host of charges in Fort McMurray Provincial Court — all but one was withdrawn by the Crown — Mr. Love was handcuffed by RCMP officers on an “outstanding warrant.” [Abuse BY process]
 
 The Crown, a David Belanger, told Judge Cleary that, as the  evidence for the list of charges was “circumstantial” [them. wny charge him in the first place?]  he was withdrawing  charges of “mailing scurrilous” material; (including the Canadian Immigration Hotline and Free Speech Monitor!) to an OXFAM campaigner and the local newspaper Fort McMurray Today. [Sec. 168]; causing a disturbance [Sec. 175.ii] and failure to attend court [Sec. 145.2]. On this latter charge (two counts). both alleged to have occurred last year, the Crown had been informed that Brad was serving a sentence for “breach of undertaking” (sending information packages to FOUR Jewish groups in Toronto) and had been so advised  by Peter Lindsay, his Toronto lawyer.
 
Very ill-advisedly, Brad pleaded guilty to “harassing” the OXFAM operative, a Mr. Crossley, by sending him material through the mail and similarly harassing the the-editor of Fort McMurray Today. How the system works is this: charges are piled  on a defendant, more court appearances hover on the horizon and, then, the accused is offered a “deal.” Mr. Love hoped to start a new job imminently and, thus, pleaded guilty to “harassing” these public figures by sending them material through the mail. He received a suspended sentence but is to have no contact with Mr. Crossley or the paper Fort McMurray Today for three years,. Thus, his right to communicate with the local press is severely limited. [Abuse BY process.]
 
In her sentence, Judge Cleary said: “Mr. Love has these views and he is not going to change. We are entitled to our views but there are limits.” There sure are in politically correct Canada where a person confronted with a politically incorrect opinion is likely to scurry off squealing to the police.
 
 
 
 
'The Legal Grinding of Brad Love

Free speech victims are slowly ground down by the judicial system. It is not just an abuse of process it is an abuse BY process.

In 2003, inveterate letter-writing Brad Love was sent to jail for 18 months for sending letters critical of immigration to 20 MPs and other public officials. He was saddled with increasingly onerous parole conditions, at one point, being forbidden to write to "any person" without their consent.

On January 19, having disposed to a host of charges in Fort McMurray Provincial Court -- all but one was withdrawn by the Crown -- Mr. Love was handcuffed by RCMP officers on an "outstanding warrant." [Abuse BY process]

 The Crown, a David Belanger, told Judge Cleary that, as the  evidence for the list of charges was "circumstantial" [them. wny charge him in the first place?]  he was withdrawing  charges of "mailing scurrilous" material; (including the Canadian Immigration Hotline and Free Speech Monitor!) to an OXFAM campaigner and the local newspaper Fort McMurray Today. [Sec. 168]; causing a disturbance [Sec. 175.ii] and failure to attend court [Sec. 145.2]. On this latter charge (two counts). both alleged to have occurred last year, the Crown had been informed that Brad was serving a sentence for "breach of undertaking" (sending information packages to FOUR Jewish groups in Toronto) and had been so advised  by Peter Lindsay, his Toronto lawyer.

Very ill-advisedly, Brad pleaded guilty to "harassing" the OXFAM operative, a Mr. Crossley, by sending him material through the mail and similarly harassing the the-editor of Fort McMurray Today. How the system works is this: charges are piled  on a defendant, more court appearances hover on the horizon and, then, the accused is offered a "deal." Mr. Love hoped to start a new job imminently and, thus, pleaded guilty to "harassing" these public figures by sending them material through the mail. He received a suspended sentence but is to have no contact with Mr. Crossley or the paper Fort McMurray Today for three years,. Thus, his right to communicate with the local press is severely limited. [Abuse BY process.]

In her sentence, Judge Cleary said: "Mr. Love has these views and he is not going to change. We are entitled to our views but there are limits." There sure are in politically correct Canada where a person confronted with a politically incorrect opinion is likely to scurry off squealing to the police.

 The surly RCMP would not confirm to me whether they had Brad in custody. On his instructions. I drove his car to his residence and secured his keys. Much later that night, he called me. He'd been released on $1,000 bail. The charges were four counts of  breach of probation [Sec. 733.1] involving communication in Edmonton, November 13, November 24, 2014 and January 7 and 8, 2015, with unnamed media in Edmonton. "Being bound by a probation order dated the 13 day of July, 2012, [Mr. Love] did without reasonable excuse, fail or refuse to comply with the order in that he failed top abstain from any political speech, correspondence, communication or commentary with any media outlet." Yes, that bail condition was actually imposed by Ontario Judge Kelly Wright, not by some judge in Cuba or North Korea.

What's quoted in the charge is not exactly what Judge Wright said. I was there. She ordered: "Mr.  Love is to refrain from any political speech or commentary to any media  outlet, political, cultural or religious group or organization, or  police organization."

At Mr. Love's first court appearance on these charges, he drove the five hours both ways to Edmonton only to find that he did not have to attend court but merely check in at the clerk's desk and get a new date. [Abuse BY process.]

Late Sunday night, March 8, Mr. Love was asleep. He'd gone to bed early to arise at 1:30 to head back to Edmonton for his next court appearance. His sleep was interrupted by knocking at about 12:30. The RCMP were there to arrest him for allegedly  making threats while working at the Suncor site outside Fort McMurray. Apparently, a fellow worker had Googled his name and decided Mr. Love was a "White supremacist" and scurried off to the police. Mr. Love was held for more than 24 hours (the legal limit) before he saw a Justice of the Peace.

The  police wanted  him held in custody but the JP did not seem overly impressed with the charges, saying, "Mr. Love's beliefs are not part of this case," and released him on $500 bail.

However, he had missed his court appearance in Edmonton. On Tuesday, Mr. Love drove to Edmonton . "I arrived in the courthouse. My name was not on any list. In court, The Crown refused to bring my file up. I did not want to be charged with failure to appear. The judge told me to go around the corner to the police station and turn  myself in. I did. I was told it takes 14 days for the system to get around to issuing a warrant for a non-appearance. I was told to come back March 17. What a screw around." That's another five hour trip each way to set a date. [Abuse BY process.]

"I can't even take a job now because I'll need two days off for these brief court appearances in the next month," he adds.

On April 8, he must appear in Fort McMurray on the most recent charge. The comical disclosure provided to him by the Crown notes that "Love wouldn't talk to the arresting officers." 

"That's right," he explodes. "On March 1, I was charged with 'breach of probation' for calling the local RCMP detachment."

The disclosure, like a secret police file from some thug state, notes: "Love has a history of contacting police and the government."

"Damn right," he answers, "I'm a taxpayer."

And the abuse BY process continues. -- Paul Fromm'
 
 The surly RCMP would not confirm to me whether they had Brad in custody. On his instructions. I drove his car to his residence and secured his keys. Much later that night, he called me. He’d been released on $1,000 bail. The charges were four counts of  breach of probation [Sec. 733.1] involving communication in Edmonton, November 13, November 24, 2014 and January 7 and 8, 2015, with unnamed media in Edmonton. “Being bound by a probation order dated the 13 day of July, 2012, [Mr. Love] did without reasonable excuse, fail or refuse to comply with the order in that he failed top abstain from any political speech, correspondence, communication or commentary with any media outlet.” Yes, that bail condition was actually imposed by Ontario Judge Kelly Wright, not by some judge in Cuba or North Korea.
 
What’s quoted in the charge is not exactly what Judge Wright said. I was there. She ordered: “Mr.  Love is to refrain from any political speech or commentary to any media  outlet, political, cultural or religious group or organization, or  police organization.”
 
At Mr. Love’s first court appearance on these charges, he drove the five hours both ways to Edmonton only to find that he did not have to attend court but merely check in at the clerk’s desk and get a new date. [Abuse BY process.]
 
Late Sunday night, March 8, Mr. Love was asleep. He’d gone to bed early to arise at 1:30 to head back to Edmonton for his next court appearance. His sleep was interrupted by knocking at about 12:30. The RCMP were there to arrest him for allegedly  making threats while working at the Suncor site outside Fort McMurray. Apparently, a fellow worker had Googled his name and decided Mr. Love was a “White supremacist” and scurried off to the police. Mr. Love was held for more than 24 hours (the legal limit) before he saw a Justice of the Peace.
 
The  police wanted  him held in custody but the JP did not seem overly impressed with the charges, saying, “Mr. Love’s beliefs are not part of this case,” and released him on $500 bail.
 
However, he had missed his court appearance in Edmonton. On Tuesday, Mr. Love drove to Edmonton . “I arrived in the courthouse. My name was not on any list. In court, The Crown refused to bring my file up. I did not want to be charged with failure to appear. The judge told me to go around the corner to the police station and turn  myself in. I did. I was told it takes 14 days for the system to get around to issuing a warrant for a non-appearance. I was told to come back March 17. What a screw around.” That’s another five hour trip each way to set a date. [Abuse BY process.]
 
“I can’t even take a job now because I’ll need two days off for these brief court appearances in the next month,” he adds.
 
On April 8, he must appear in Fort McMurray on the most recent charge. The comical disclosure provided to him by the Crown notes that “Love wouldn’t talk to the arresting officers.” 
 
“That’s right,” he explodes. “On March 1, I was charged with ‘breach of probation’ for calling the local RCMP detachment.”
 
The disclosure, like a secret police file from some thug state, notes: “Love has a history of contacting police and the government.”
 
“Damn right,” he answers, “I’m a taxpayer.”
 
And the abuse BY process continues. — Paul Fromm

CAFE Appears on Deanna Singola Show

'I had a great time today on the Deanna Spingola Show on Republic Broadcasting. I spent two hours discussing the attack on free speech in Canuckistan -- the weekend arrest of political prisoner Brad Love for discussing Canada's foreign aid waste with a canvasser for SOS and for calling the Fort McMurray detachment of the RCMP and asking how a Pakistani woman could enter Canada from a terrorist hotbed like Pakistan (her homeland that she'd recently visited) carrying a poisonous bug spray. He's charged with "breach of probation" for expressing his opinions. I also hammered the hypocrisy of German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francois Hollande. Both marched for free speech in early January and proclaimed "Je suis Charlie". Yet, both are tossing free thinkers in prison,. Last week, lawyer Sylvia Stolz was sentenced to 20 months in prison for making a speech in SWITZERLAND in 2012 discussing restrictions of free speech in Germany. And, in France, teacher Vincent Reyounard was sentenced to two years in prison for expressing doubts on Facebook about the Hollywood version of WW II, particularly the new religion of holocaust.'
Host Deanna Spingola.

CAFE Appears on Deanna Singola Show

I had a great time today on the Deanna Spingola Show on Republic Broadcasting. I spent two hours discussing the attack on free speech in Canuckistan — the weekend arrest of political prisoner Brad Love for discussing Canada’s foreign aid waste with a canvasser for SOS and for calling the Fort McMurray detachment of the RCMP and asking how a Pakistani woman could enter Canada from a terrorist hotbed like Pakistan (her homeland that she’d recently visited) carrying a poisonous bug spray. He’s charged with “breach of probation” for expressing his opinions. I also hammered the hypocrisy of German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Francois Hollande. Both marched for free speech in early January and proclaimed “Je suis Charlie”. Yet, both are tossing free thinkers in prison,. Last week, lawyer Sylvia Stolz was sentenced to 20 months in prison for making a speech in SWITZERLAND in 2012 discussing restrictions of free speech in Germany. And, in France, teacher Vincent Reyounard was sentenced to two years in prison for expressing doubts on Facebook about the Hollywood version of WW II, particularly the new religion of holocaust.

 

Canadian Association for Free Expression
Box 332,
Rexdale, Ontario, M9W 5L3
Ph: 905-566-4455; FAX: 905-566-4820;
Website http://cafe.nfshost.com

Paul Fromm, B.Ed, M.A. Director

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Brad Love Charge With Breach of Probation for Talking to Charity Fundraiser and Calling RCMP To Ask About Pakistani Poisoner
REXDALE. March 1, 2015 “There’s definitely a bull’s eye target on former political prisoner Brad Love’s back,” says Paul Fromm, Director of the Canadian Association for Free Expression. Mr. Love was convicted under Canada’s notorious “hate law” in 2003 for writing letters to 20 public officials. He has been under increasingly onerous probation conditions ever since. At one point, former Ontario Judge Hogg imposed bail conditions that forbade him to write to “any person” without their consent.
Yesterday, Mr. Love attended the Winter Festival in Fort. McMurray, where he lives. He spied a table set up by SOS. He approached and plunked a wad of bank notes down on the table. “I’ll give you this entire roll, if you can tell me how much Canada’s government is giving to Haiti in foreign aid,” said aid opponent Love.
'Canadian Association for Free Expression
Box 332,
Rexdale, Ontario, M9W 5L3
Ph: 905-566-4455; FAX: 905-566-4820;
Website http://cafe.nfshost.com

Paul Fromm, B.Ed, M.A. Director

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Brad Love Charge With Breach of Probation for Talking to Charity Fundraiser and Calling RCMP To Ask About Pakistani Poisoner

REXDALE. March 1, 2015 "There's definitely a bull's eye target on former political prisoner Brad Love's back," says Paul Fromm, Director of the Canadian Association for Free Expression. Mr. Love was convicted under Canada's notorious "hate law" in 2003 for writing letters to 20 public officials. He has been under increasingly onerous probation conditions ever since. At one point, former Ontario Judge Hogg imposed bail conditions that forbade him to write to "any person" without their consent.

Yesterday, Mr. Love attended the Winter Festival in Fort. McMurray, where he lives. He spied a table set up by SOS. He approached and plunked a wad of bank notes down on the table. "I'll give you this entire roll, if you can tell me how much Canada's government is giving to Haiti in foreign aid," said aid opponent Love.

"Are you Brad Love?" the apprehensive man asked. Mr. Love confirmed his identity.

"You scrape to raise pennies and the Harper government has given hundreds of millions to Haiti," Mr. Love added. They talked for a few minutes and Mr. Love moved on.

SOS stands for Some Other Solutions are runs a crisis prevention service.

On returning home, he called the local Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) to inquire about an investigation into a Pakistani immigrant who recently returned from a visit to her homeland with pesticide that is not authorized in Canada. She used it to try to get rid of bedbugs and, in the process, two of her children died of poisoning and two more are in hospital.

"How could she get into Canada with this poison? Mr. Love asked. "Isn't Pakistan one of those nations that exports terrorists that Prime Minister Harper is always talking about? "

The person answering the phone said she felt "threatened" and hung up.

Twenty minutes later, three RCMP officers arrived at Mr. Love's townhouse and arrested him for "breach of probation" to talking to the SOS representative and making his inquiry at the RCMP detachment. His probation conditions, imposed by Ontario Judge Kelly Wright as part of  a brutal 18 months sentence for breach of undertaking (which usually attracts a 30 day sentence) imposed a three year ban: ""Mr.  Love is to refrain from any political speech or commentary to any media outlet, political, cultural or religious group or organization, or police organization,."

"Yes, this gag order was imposed in Canada, not Cuba or North Korea," says Mr. Fromm, who has championed Mr. Love's battle for free speech. "This is a country where press and politicians were tripping over themselves six weeks ago to proclaim 'Je suis, Charlie' and stand up for freedom of speech in France," he added. "It's time to stand up for it here!"

Early Sunday morning, Mr. Love appeared by video-conference before a JP. The police opposed bail. Mr. Love was freed on $500 bail.

Mr. Love is to appear in court March 9. "I will be seeking a jury trial. I am not allowed to talk to the media. I want 12 people to hear how this system has trampled on my freedom of speech."'
“Are you Brad Love?” the apprehensive man asked. Mr. Love confirmed his identity.
“You scrape to raise pennies and the Harper government has given hundreds of millions to Haiti,” Mr. Love added. They talked for a few minutes and Mr. Love moved on.
SOS stands for Some Other Solutions are runs a crisis prevention service.
On returning home, he called the local Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) to inquire about an investigation into a Pakistani immigrant who recently returned from a visit to her homeland with pesticide that is not authorized in Canada. She used it to try to get rid of bedbugs and, in the process, two of her children died of poisoning and two more are in hospital.
“How could she get into Canada with this poison? Mr. Love asked. “Isn’t Pakistan one of those nations that exports terrorists that Prime Minister Harper is always talking about? ”

The person answering the phone said she felt “threatened” and hung up.
Twenty minutes later, three RCMP officers arrived at Mr. Love’s townhouse and arrested him for “breach of probation” to talking to the SOS representative and making his inquiry at the RCMP detachment. His probation conditions, imposed by Ontario Judge Kelly Wright as part of  a brutal 18 months sentence for breach of undertaking (which usually attracts a 30 day sentence) imposed a three year ban: “”Mr.  Love is to refrain from any political speech or commentary to any media outlet, political, cultural or religious group or organization, or police organization,.”
“Yes, this gag order was imposed in Canada, not Cuba or North Korea,” says Mr. Fromm, who has championed Mr. Love’s battle for free speech. “This is a country where press and politicians were tripping over themselves six weeks ago to proclaim ‘Je suis, Charlie’ and stand up for freedom of speech in France,” he added. “It’s time to stand up for it here!”
Early Sunday morning, Mr. Love appeared by video-conference before a JP. The police opposed bail. Mr. Love was freed on $500 bail.
Mr. Love is to appear in court March 9. “I will be seeking a jury trial. I am not allowed to talk to the media. I want 12 people to hear how this system has trampled on my freedom of speech.”

Je Suis Brad — Attend Trial of “Citizen Journalist” — Fort McMurray, Monday, January 19, 2015

Canadian Association for Free Expression

Box 332,

Rexdale, Ontario, M9W 5L3

Ph: 905-566-4455; FAX: 905-566-4820;

Website http://cafe.nfshost.com

 

Paul Fromm, B.Ed, M.A. Director

January 18, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Je Suis Brad — Attend Trial of “Citizen Journalist” — Fort McMurray, Monday, January 19, 2015

A week ago, many Canadians joined rallies across the country supporting free speech and showing solidarity with the victims of the radical Islamic terrorists who gunned down 12 people at French satirical paper Charlie Hebdo in Paris.

Most Canadians smugly thought free speech as safe in Canada. After all, we have Trudeau’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms with its guarantees of freedom of speech, freedom of opinion, freedom of the press. Sadly, due to the weasel clauses in the Charter, these rights have been steadily eroded since it took effect in 1982.

A good case in point is inveterate letter writer, Brad Love, a construction worker in Fort McMurray, Alberta. A self taught writer, inveterate reader and opinionated curmudgeon, Mr. Love’s problems began in 2002. Over a 20 year period, he estimates he’d written over 10,000 letters to politicians at all levels, the media and public figures. That year he was charged under Canada’s notorious “hate” law — Section 318 of the Criminal Code — for 20 letters he’s written to politicians and public figures. It must be emphasize that none of these letters contained threats — just his populist opinions. He is critical of foreign aid, immigration and waste of taxpayers’ money.

Mr. Love was sentenced to 18 months in prison — the stiffest sentence ever handed down under the “hate law” — for writing letters. Amnesty International defines a prisoner of conscience or political prisoner as someone punished or jailed for the non-violent expression of his political, religious or cultural views. Yes, Brad Love is a political prisoner and may soon be so again. This situation is a disgrace to Canada.

However, when he was released in 2003, Mr, Love faced a three year parole and increasingly restrictive conditions. At one point, an Ontario judge named Hogg imposed the condition that he could not write to “anyone” without their consent. That condition

In 2012, Mr. Love was convicted of “breach of undertaking” for having sent opinionated information packages to several Toronto Jewish groups, having obtained their oral consent. For this he received 18 months and a further three year gag order. The average sentence for a drug dealing gangbanger for “breach of bail” is 60 days, A non-violent letter writer draws 18 months,

In 2013, Mr. Love was charged in Fort McMurray with “sending scurrilous material through the mail” and “harassment” for repeated communications with the editor of Fort McMurray Today, which advertises that it WANTS its readers’ comments,  and a local representative of OXFAM.

When initially charged, Mr. Love’s bail forbade him to “write by e-mail, text or letter” to any person, presumably not even his gravely ill mother in Ontario. Again, this brutal gag was imposed, not in North Korea or Cuba or Saudi Arabia, but in Alberta, Canada.

Last September, just as Mr. Love was completely his “breach” sentence in Ontario, Albert sent two officers to bring him back in handcuffs and leg irons in a wheelchair to Alberta like some murderer, bank robber or drug lord — all for non-violent communication. What did the three airfares, travel expenses and salaries cost the taxpayers of Alberta?

On Monday, January 19 at 9:30, Mr. Love will go on trial in the Provincial Courthouse (9700 Franklin Ave.) in Fort McMurray.

“Free speech is the issue,” says Paul Fromm Director of the Canadian Association for Free Expression which has championed Mr. Love’s struggle since 2003.

“In the education system we both grew up in in Etobicoke, Ontario, we were told that citizenship implied certain duties. A good citizen should inform himself, care, take a stand and voice his opinion. Mr. Love’s outspoken populism may not be everybody’s cup of tea, but by any measure, he is a good citizen, a concerned citizen and should be honoured for his commitment not prosecuted,” Mr. Fromm adds.

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Contact Paul Fromm — 416-428-5308