Parler’s website shows signs of life with a brief message to ‘lovers and haters’

Parler’s website shows signs of life with a brief message to ‘lovers and haters’

By Brian Fung, CNN Business

Updated 10:26 AM ET, Mon January 18, 2021

This illustration picture shows the social media website from Parler displayed on a computer screen in Arlington, Virginia on July 2, 2020. - Amid rising turmoil in social media, recently formed social network Parler is gaining with prominent political conservatives who claim their voices are being silenced by Silicon Valley giants. Parler, founded in Nevada in 2018, bills itself as an alternative to "ideological suppression" at other social networks. (Photo by Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images)
This illustration picture shows the social media website from Parler displayed on a computer screen in Arlington, Virginia on July 2, 2020. - Amid rising turmoil in social media, recently formed social network Parler is gaining with prominent political conservatives who claim their voices are being silenced by Silicon Valley giants. Parler, founded in Nevada in 2018, bills itself as an alternative to "ideological suppression" at other social networks. (Photo by Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images)

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President Donald Trump arrives to speak at a rally protesting the electoral college certification of Joe Biden as President, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

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President Donald Trump arrives to speak at a rally protesting the electoral college certification of Joe Biden as President, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

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Washington (CNN Busness)Parler’s website suddenly reappeared online Sunday afternoon with a message from its CEO, John Matze: “Hello world, is this thing on?”The message, dated January 16, implies that the social network popular with members of the far right has found a new online hosting platform, after Parler was booted from Amazon Web Services on January 10 in the wake of the Capitol siege. Parler’s domain is now registered with Epik, according to a WHOIS search. Epik is a company that sells domain names and is also the domain registrar for Gab, an alternative social network often used by members of the far-right. It remains unclear who is Parler’s web host; Parler didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.Robert Davis, a spokesman for Epik, said the company does not provide Parler’s web hosting. Epik, he said, has a zero-tolerance approach to fighting racism, “and actively denounces any activities utilized to create hardship for others based on skin color, ethnicity, origin, or belief system.”Davis also referred CNN to a Jan. 14 blog post that confirmed Parler had approached Epik about registering its domain on Jan. 11. Earlier that same day,Epik had issued a lengthy statement blasting what it said was a “kneejerk reaction” by major companies of “simply deplatforming and terminating any relationship that on the surface looks problematic or controversial.”Parler's website has returned online.Parler’s website has returned online.A temporary status update on parler.com also appeared beneath Matze’s message.”Now seems like the right time to remind you all — both lovers and haters — why we started this platform,” the status update said. “We believe privacy is paramount and free speech essential, especially on social media. Our aim has always been to provide a nonpartisan public square where individuals can enjoy and exercise their rights to both. We will resolve any challenge before us and plan to welcome all of you back soon. We will not let civil discourse perish!”

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Gab: Everything you need to know about the fast-growing, controversial social network

Gab: Everything you need to know about the fast-growing, controversial social networkParler was ejected from AWS last week following what Amazon has described as dozens of threats of violence that violated Amazon’s terms of service. Parler responded with a lawsuit against Amazon, asking a federal court to block Amazon’s decision. – Correction: A previous version of this article misidentified Epik’s business relationship with Parler and other websites. Parler’s domain is registered with Epik.

Amazon Bans Parler for ‘Violence’ But Allows ‘Kill All Republicans’ T-Shirts

Amazon Bans Parler for ‘Violence’ But Allows ‘Kill All Republicans’ T-Shirts

January 16, 2021 Winter Watch Around the Web, Business, Politics, US News 0

GRAPHIC: via Roosh V

Always Remember: The Left is projecting on you what they are doing in spades.

By Brittany Jordan | 16 January 2021

FEDERAL INQUIRER — Last week the tech giants colluded together in an attempt to destroy social media alternative Parler.

The final straw came when far left Amazon banned Parler from using its cloud service.

This shut down the popular app after millions of conservatives flocked to Parler after Twitter began purging top conservative thought leaders including the President of the United States.

Amazon said it was due to “violence” on the app which is an excuse and a lie.

Parler is still struggling to replace Amazon’s cloud service.

Ryan Fournier later pointed out that Amazon is selling “Kill all Republicans” on its website.

But Parler is the problem?

Big Tech companies are at war with Social Media sites Gab and Parler!

Big Tech companies are at war with Social Media sites Gab and Parler!

The biggest ones are probably the removal of Gab from the App Store and Google Play store.  In addition to that, mainstream online financial services companies such as PayPal and Stripe curtailed all the access from their platforms to Gab.

Reason:  Gab joins other less restrictive social media platforms that have seen a surge in traffic since the November general election and recent blocks of accounts of Trump and his high-profile supporters.
In addition to Gab, these platforms include Parler (recently banned from Google Play and App Store as well), TheDonald, and MeWe.

This trend embodies a growing need of people to freely express themselves in the wake of pressures they experience regarding what they are allowed to say.

The restrictions to the freedom of speech that are happening these days are genuinely unprecedented in American history.

The President has not only received a permanent ban on his personal Twitter account but also saw some of his tweets from the official presidential Twitter account removed.It is understandable how more and more people each day are switching to alternative platforms such as Gab in order to be able to raise their voice.


Big Tech strikes again, Twitter in particular to Censor, Violating the First Amendment.

After the tech wide ban of Donald Trump, the inconsistencies of social media platforms remain laughable.Twitter and Facebook stated that permanently removing President Trump’s accounts was to protect people and stop the ever-growing incitement of violence.  Additionally, the vast majority of accounts also removed were US conservatives accounts, including Michael Flynn and Sidney Powell’s accounts.

However, Twitter was perfectly fine and happy to allow the disgusting phrase ‘Hang Mike Pence’ to remain on the trending page, culminating in over 14,000 tweets after Twitter purged a large majority of Conservative users on the site on Friday.The account of Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei still remains active.

Twitter doesn’t care about users. If they did, accounts like Khamenei’s would have been terminated a long time ago and phrases like ‘Hang Mike Pence’ wouldn’t be allowed to trend.


Twitter’s selective use of their own Communist policies shows that they simply do not care, and by silencing the current leader of the free world, they wanted the rest of the world to know what kind of power they have–so let’s take it away by boycotting twitter–pass the word!
More patriotism of twitter:  Twitter Hires Chinese Communist Party-Linked AI Expert Who Wanted to Hide ‘Secret’ Weapons Contracts

Parler sues Amazon, asks court to reinstate platform

Parler sues Amazon, asks court to reinstate platform

By John Kruzel and Chris Mills Rodrigo – 01/11/21 12:37 PM ES

Social media company Parler sued Amazon on Monday, alleging that its suspension from Amazon’s hosting service violated antitrust law and breached the companies’ contractual arrangement.

In its lawsuit, Parler, which is especially popular among conservatives, asked a federal judge to order that the platform be reinstated online.

The 18-page complaint, filed in U.S. District Court in Seattle, where Amazon is headquartered, accuses Amazon Web Services (AWS) of applying a politically motivated double standard to Parler in contrast to its treatment of the more mainstream social media giant Twitter.

“AWS’s decision to effectively terminate Parler’s account is apparently motivated by political animus,” the lawsuit reads. “It is also apparently designed to reduce competition in the microblogging services market to the benefit of Twitter.”

Multiple legal experts told The Hill that Parler’s antitrust claim was unlikely to succeed. The lawsuit does not establish that Parler’s suspension was part of an agreement between Amazon and Twitter, the rival social media company that Parler identified as the beneficiary of its shutdown.

“On the antitrust side, it’s pretty weak,” said Erik Hovenkamp, a law professor at the University of Southern California. “The biggest flaw in the complaint by far is really just that it doesn’t allege facts that would indicate a conspiracy between Amazon and Twitter.”

The lawsuit comes a day after Amazon suspended Parler, citing concerns it could not adequately screen out potentially incendiary content, including material that incites violence. It also follows Wednesday’s deadly, Trump-inspired insurrection at the U.S. Capitol that left five people dead.

The app saw a massive surge in users between the mob attack at the Capitol and when it was pulled down from Amazon Web Services.

Parler saw approximately 825,000 installs from the Apple and Google stores between Wednesday and Sunday, a more than 1,000 percent increase from the same period a week earlier, according to data from SensorTower shared with The Hill.

Parler told the court that its newfound popularity explained part of the urgency behind its emergency request to have its suspension reversed.

“It will kill Parler’s business — at the very time it is set to skyrocket,” the filing states.

In addition to its antitrust claim, Parler also alleged that Amazon breached their contract by not giving 30 days notice before terminating Parler’s account. 

However, Amazon told The Hill that it notified Parler over the past several weeks that numerous posts on its site had promoted violence, in violation of their agreed-upon terms. According to a letter obtained by BuzzFeed, Amazon informed Parler of 98 examples of content “that clearly encourage and incite violence” over that timeframe.

“We made our concerns known to Parler over a number of weeks and during that time we saw a significant increase in this type of dangerous content, not a decrease, which led to our suspension of their services Sunday evening,” an AWS spokesperson told The Hill.

However, Amazon reportedly notified Parler over the past several weeks that numerous posts on its site had promoted violence, in violation of their agreed-upon terms. According to a letter obtained by BuzzFeed, Amazon informed Parler of 98 examples of content “that clearly encourage and incite violence” over that timeframe.

David Hoffman, a law professor at the University of Pennsylvania, said it would severely undercut Parler’s breach of contract claim if in fact Amazon had warned the company repeatedly that it was playing host to offensive material.

“It’s not simply that there’s one day of bad posts,” Hoffman said, referring to Amazon’s letter. “There have been repeated warnings over time about Parler’s failure to comply with Amazon’s terms of use. Given those repeated warnings over time, it’s sort of rich to say, ‘You didn’t give us enough time.’”

Hoffman also noted that Amazon’s standard policy is to resolve web-hosting disputes through an arbitration process rather than in the courts, presenting another potential legal pitfall for Parler.   

Amazon’s suspension of Parler came after the Apple and Google app stores — essentially the only places for Americans to download mobile apps — decided over the weekend to stop carrying Parler.

The furor over the app stems from its role in facilitating last week’s violent riot at the Capitol. Trump supporters and right-wing extremists used the app, which has billed itself as a haven for free speech, to coordinate and incite the demonstrations ostensibly opposing the certification of President-elect Joe Biden’s victory.

Without access to Amazon Web Services, the app has been dark on Monday.